89 Search Results for PODD

AAC Posts from PrAACtical Week 41, October 2014

October 11, 2014 by - Leave your thoughts

AAC Posts from PrAACtical Week 41, October 2014

Sunday: Video of the Week – The Communication Portfolio Monday: Strategy of the Month – Building an Understanding of AAC in Your Workplace Tuesday: PrAACtical Resources: Developing AAC Policies for Schools Wednesday: Watch It Wednesday: Communicating with AAC Thursday: How I Do It by Rachael Langley: PODD in the Classroom – Quick Tips for Teams Friday: Fast FAACt Friday: On Symbols and Reading

Strategy of the Month: How Clear Priorities and A Little Sacrifice Build Engagement

September 22, 2014 by - Leave your thoughts

Strategy of the Month: How Clear Priorities and A Little Sacrifice Build Engagement

We can’t complete our thoughts on engaging AAC learners without a bit of conversation around the topic of priorities. Here’s the main idea: Go into each activity having a clear priority for what you want to achieve. Everything else become negotiable. As SLPs, sometimes we want it all. We want therapy activities where the AAC learner initiates communications, uses new vocabulary, creates novel sentences, experiments with new grammatical forms, and kicks some morphological butt. We.want.it.all. After a few decades of being an AAC practitioner, I think I’m finally learning that trying to have it all isn’t always the best option. It isn’t about what I want, it’s about what my client needs. Sigh. In this approach, we look at the lesson or activity and create our “Must Have List.’ For Mayra, a kindergartner just learning to use symbols for the first time, our lessons ‘must’ be engaging, have high pay-off... [Read More...]

Alphabet Soup: Acronyms for AAC Practitioners

September 5, 2014 by - Leave your thoughts

Alphabet Soup: Acronyms for AAC Practitioners

We’re excited about the passion and enthusiasm for AAC shown by many new SLPs and graduate student clinicians. One of the things they sometimes struggle with in reading and writing reports is the number of acronyms that we tend to use. This is always a problem in clinical and scholarly writing, but when the field is incredibly diverse and transdisciplinary, the challenges multiply. Here’s a starter list of acronyms* and their meanings. Many, MANY thanks to those who helped us create this list on the PrAACtical AAC Facebook page. AAC-RERC – AAC Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center ACOLUG – Augmentative Communication Online Users’ Group AiLS, ALgS, and ALs – Aided language stimulation ALI – Aided language input ALS – Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis AOTA – American Occupational Therapy Association APTA – American Physical Therapy Association ASD – Autism spectrum disorder ASHA – American Speech Language Hearing Association AT – Assistive technology ATIA... [Read More...]

AAC Posts from PrAACtical Week 35, August 2014

August 30, 2014 by - Leave your thoughts

AAC Posts from PrAACtical Week 35, August 2014

Sunday: Video of the Week – Is It the Right Device? Monday: Speak AAC Tuesday: Calling All PrAACtical Advocates Wednesday: 5 AAC-related Assessment Tools You Should Know About Thursday: How I Do It – Using PODD Books and Aided Language Displays with Young Learners with ASD Friday: Fast FAACt Friday: Core Words

AAC Posts from PrAACtical Week 34, August 2014

August 23, 2014 by - Leave your thoughts

AAC Posts from PrAACtical Week 34, August 2014

Sunday-Video of the Week: PODD in the ASD Classroom Monday-Something to Say Tuesday-PrAACtical Resources on Communication and Autism Wednesday-PrAACtical Resources on PODD & Partner Assisted Scanning Thursday-PrAACtical Resources on the SETT Framework Friday-PrAACtical Resources on AAC & Language Therapy

AACtual Therapy: Informal Assessment Activity with Jeanne Tuthill

July 31, 2014 by - Leave your thoughts

AACtual Therapy: Informal Assessment Activity with Jeanne Tuthill

We are so pleased to have a return visit by SLP Jeanne Tuthill. In this post, she shares an informal assessment activity based around a Book of Favorites. Enjoy! ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: Greetings from Massachusetts! My work at the Collaborative for Educational Services is on a school-year contract so I’m currently on summer break with my three girls.  We’ve been plenty busy with fun summer activities but my learning and growing as an AAC therapist isn’t tied to my contract dates.  I’ve also been busy watching webinars, reading some great books (educational as well as pleasure-reading), and following the Facebook feeds of some of my favorite AAC peeps!  I really wish I could have attended ISAAC in Lisbon, Portugal this year…I loved seeing everyone’s photos and posts from what looked to be a spectacular conference! In my last post on assessment I shared with you an ice-breaker activity that is low-stress for... [Read More...]

Make Your Own Communication Book Stand

November 10, 2013 by - 2 Comments

Make Your Own Communication Book Stand

How can you make AAC learning easier with an empty binder and some duct tape? Stay tuned! Mary-Louise Bertram demonstrates how to make a portable stand for a PODD book, that could also work well for other kinds of communication books. Not only is this an inexpensive DIY solution, but one that allows you to use the book flat on the table or angled on the stand. Great for aided language input! We love the idea of repurposing for 3-ring binders, too.     Here is the direct link, if you need it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lJUKepEX4Xk

Strategy of the Month: Back to School with AAC

August 3, 2013 by - 4 Comments

Back to School with AAC

Here in the US, August is Back-to-School month. Throughout this month, we’ll try to post ideas and resources to help make the transition back to school a smooth and successful one. One of the most important things for students who use AAC is having their SLPs, teachers, and families on the same page. They each have a different but very intense relationship with the student’s AAC system. Here are some prAACtical thoughts on getting everyone on the same page. 1.  Develop a communication profile of the student: In the initial weeks, try to get a baseline of how the student is communicating at the start of the year. For beginning communicators, we track things like their communicative intents (WHY they are communicating), modalities (HOW they are communicating), and the frequency of their communication. We’ve written about one of our favorite tools for this, the Communication Matrix. 2. Share what you know:... [Read More...]

5 Things to Remember About AAC Technology

August 1, 2013 by - 2 Comments

5 Things to Remember About AAC Technology

AAC technology is awesome. It really is. But it isn’t always ‘the answer.’ Here are a few things we try to keep in mind. 1. It’s not always the most efficient way for someone to communicate. Vocalizations, word approximations, gestures, and manual signs may be quicker and easier. 2. You always need a back-up. Another device, an app, a communication board, a PODD book, a print-out of the main SGD screens. Something. 3. It may not be the preferred means of communication with family and close friends. It’s not up to us to make that call. 4. The ‘latest thing’ isn’t always the best. Some of our prAACtical friends still lament the loss of the built-in printer on the Liberator. For them, the smaller, sleeker design of replacement devices weren’t worth the trade-off. 5. We generally don’t maximize the devices/apps we have. In some situations, there are useful features that... [Read More...]

Fresh Look: AAC for Children Who Have Rett Syndrome with Dr. Theresa Bartolotta

May 23, 2013 by - 19 Comments

Fresh Look: AAC for Children Who Have Rett Syndrome with Dr. Theresa Bartolotta

In our SLP training programs, few of us learned about Rett Syndrome or how to provide services to children with that disorder. We’re so pleased to have a guest post on AAC services for children with Rett by Dr. Theresa Bartolotta, Director of Assessment in the Office of the Provost, and Associate Professor in the Department of Speech-Language Pathology, at Seton Hall University, in South Orange, New Jersey. An SLP with over 30 years of clinical experience, she specializes in communication disorders in children with significant disabilities with a special interest in autism and Rett syndrome. Our field is still learning about Rett syndrome and we are still discovering new things about the range of skills and abilities present in the children who have it. In this post, Dr. Bartolotta gives us some background about the syndrome and discusses implications for treatment. I am thrilled to have this opportunity to post... [Read More...]