45 Search Results for aac and aphasia

Low Tech AAC for Adults with Aphasia: What Does That Mean?

May 27, 2014 by - 1 Comment

Low Tech AAC for Adults with Aphasia: What Does That Mean?

  Aphasia Awareness Month is just around the corner, and getting us ready for that is this wonderful post on using low tech AAC with people who have aphasia. We’re delighted to welcome back our friend and colleague, Dr. Kristy Weissling, who is collaborating with Heather Buhr, to share some thoughts on this topic. ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: For many, the term Augmentative and Alternative (AAC) brings to mind technology, speech-generating devices, and now – more than ever before – iPads.  But as we know, AAC encompasses much more than that. We all use AAC when we make facial expressions or gestures, use symbols or pictures, or write.  We would like to explore AAC and more “low-tech” options that help our clients express their thoughts, needs, wants, and ideas.  Low-tech strategies can range from the use of written choice, to communication boards, to communication books.  In this article we will specifically address communication... [Read More...]

Talking Mats: A PrAACtical Tool

April 16, 2014 by - 4 Comments

Talking Mats: A PrAACtical Tool

We’ve shared about Talking Mats in a video and on our Facebook page, but we needed to call on the experts to go into more detail about this approach. Thankfully, the co-directors of this project, Dr. Joan Murphy and Lois Cameron, were willing to collaborate. in this post, Dr. Murphy shares her knowledge with us. Hope you enjoy learning about the implementation of Talking Mats as much as we did. What is Talking Mats? Talking Mats is an innovative, award-winning communication tool which is based on extensive research and designed by Speech and Language Therapists in Scotland. Our vision is to improve the lives of people with communication difficulties by increasing their capacity to express their views about things that matter to them. Talking Mats is an interactive resource that uses three sets of picture symbols – top scale, topics and options and a space on which to display them.... [Read More...]

10 AAC Intervention Strategies We Can’t Live Without

September 13, 2013 by - 3 Comments

10 AAC Intervention Strategies We Can’t Live Without

It’s a new semester for us and we’re having lots of conversations with student clinicians about teaching strategies. Here are some of the things they’re putting in their AAC toolkits. Making language visible: Use visual supports to give information, explain, set boundaries, and make expectations clear. Aided language input and focused language stimulation: Teach AAC by speaking AAC. Communication temptations: Make the client want to communicate to get his/her own agenda met Expansions and extensions: The language facilitation strategies we all studied in our language intervention classes work in AAC, too! Repetition with variety: Working on the same thing in different ways is a sure way to build learning and keep treidthings fresh Contrastive examples: Teach through the power of clear examples, both positive AND negative  Backward and forward chaining: Great for teaching things that have multiple steps, like sending emails or posting to Facebook Structure: Creating structure helps learner better... [Read More...]

Making It Work: 6 AAC Strategies for People with Aphasia

June 29, 2013 by - 4 Comments

Making It Work: 6 AAC Strategies for People with Aphasia

People with aphasia are often most successful when a number of different strategies are combined. In this post, we discuss a number of strategies that we can use in our therapy and teach to communication partners. Augmented Input We’ve written so many posts about aided language input that we’re almost embarrassed to bring it up again. Almost. It seems like no matter which age group or clinical population is the subject of our post, that strategy plays a central role. It is the same for people with aphasia with one exception. They benefit from a broader array of input cues, such as gestures, writing, and even pantomime. Augmented input is the term that is used to refer to oral language that is supplemented with pictures, print, gestures, pantomime, and the use of objects in the environment. By using these things as you speak, you enhance the ability of the person... [Read More...]

Bridging the Gap: Helping People with Aphasia to Compensate for Their Language Difficulties

June 26, 2013 by - Leave your thoughts

Bridging the Gap: Helping People with Aphasia to Compensate for Their Language Difficulties

We’re wrapping up Aphasia Month with another fine post from Dr. Kristy Weissling. You can see her earlier posts here and here. In this post, Kristy shares her thoughts on how SLPs can use AAC supports to help individuals with aphasia compensate for their language difficulties. In 2010, my colleague, Carrie Prentice, and I talked about the role of both remediation and compensation in the speech rehabilitation programs of people with aphasia.  At that time, we were trying to emphasize that at any particular time in the rehabilitation process, from acute care to outpatient rehabilitation, all possible alternatives should be balanced to create an individualized treatment program.  Both restorative and compensatory mechanisms are available to therapist throughout this process.  We proposed the work of Dixon, Garrett, and Backman (2008) to formulate a framework for discussing compensation.  Six mechanisms of compensation were identified in their chapter on principles of compensation in... [Read More...]

Aphasia, Supported Communication, Written Choice Strategy, + Variations

June 22, 2013 by - Leave your thoughts

Aphasia, SUpported Communication, Written Choice Plus Variations

This month, we have enjoyed writing about communication strategies for aphasia. Partner supported communication is the platform  for many of the effective techniques we use to help people with aphasia initiate, maintain, or terminate communication and conversation. We have talked about assessment strategies, communication books, and alphabet &  topic supplementation. Now it is time to discuss the written choice strategy. The written choice strategy is fairly easy to implement, can look natural, and can result in seamless detailed conversation. Written choices are provided in the context of conversation and are displayed in an organized manner.  What is It?  The written choice strategy has the partner/facilitator generating written key-word choices that relate to the conversational topic. The written choices can be paired with text, pictures, drawings, symbols, and natural speech. The partner/facilitator writes possible answers to conversational questions in list form. The conversation is extended as continued written choices are offered... [Read More...]

A Fresh Look at AAC & Aphasia with Dr. Kristy Weissling

June 17, 2013 by - Leave your thoughts

Fresh Look at AAC & Aphasia with Dr. Kristy Weissling

We’re so pleased to be able to share the thoughts of our friend and colleague, Dr. Kristy Weissling, on providing AAC supports to people with aphasia. She received her professional doctorate from Nova Southeastern University and is currently an Assistant Professor of Practice and clinical supervisor at the Barkley Speech-Language and Hearing Clinic at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Her research and teaching interests include, aphasia, cognitive communication impairments, and AAC. She participates in implementation of a portion of the RERC grant project at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.  She has been an instructor in aphasia and cognitive linguistic impairments for 15 years and teaches in both online and live formats. Her clinical load includes individual and group treatment of individuals with aphasia, traumatic brain injury, and early cognitive decline.  In this post, Kristy reflects on three articles that have shaped her clinical services and teaching. :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: I have been working with people who... [Read More...]

More than Speech: Communication & Aphasia

June 9, 2013 by - Leave your thoughts

More Than Speech: Communication & Aphasia

Life is Larger Than… APHASIA  is the title of the Aphasia Institute’s 30th anniversary video made by group members, volunteers, and staff. Although life is larger than… APHASIA, the power of communication and sharing stories is so apparent. Enjoy the video, but check out the Aphasia Institute’s website for resources, information and a visual support for understanding the mission: “Giving hope to people with aphasia and their families by developing and sharing innovative solutions that reduce language barriers to full life participation”.

Communication Books & Aphasia

June 8, 2013 by - 1 Comment

Communication Books & Aphasia

We know aphasia intervention has moved well beyond traditional speech and language training and intervention.  We are so happy it has moved to an authentic participation, functional communication, and social interaction focus. Communication books are one tool for helping people with aphasia be active participants in conversation and comprehensive communication. Here are some thoughts and ideas about communication books to get started. Communication Books- Communication books for adults with aphasia can be in grid format with relevant communication messages. There can be a few pages or many, but keep in mind that the more pages, the longer it will take to navigate. It is most important to include high priority and relevant messages that will support needed communication and not just ‘standard’ messages. There are many samples and templates that can be purchased or downloaded for adult communication books. These may be good as a start, but should be individualized when... [Read More...]

5 PrAACtical Thoughts on Catch-Up Conversations

June 4, 2013 by - Leave your thoughts

5 PrAACtical Thoughts on Catch-Up Conversations

One of the things SLPs frequently do at the start of their therapy sessions is have some casual conversations with their clients to catch up on what happened since their last visit. Whether it is an elementary school student with ASD, a teenager with cerebral palsy, or an older adult with aphasia, we engage in polite conversation to find out what they’ve been up to and perhaps share a bit about our own experiences. Here are some thoughts on making those ‘catch-up conversations’ work from a prAACtical perspective. 1. Possible goal areas: initiate conversation; maintain dialogue on an established topic; redirect conversation to a new topic; respond to non-obligatory communication opportunities; use temporal terms in multi-word utterances; convey a personal narrative with a clear beginning, middle, and end; use regular past tense verbs; ask partner-focused questions 2. Core language targets: it, we, they, do/did, have/had, was/were, not It was (not);... [Read More...]