375 Search Results for year of core words

How I Do It: Writing IEP Goals for Students Who Use AAC with Lauren Enders

April 25, 2013 by - 6 Comments

How I Do It: Writing IEP Goals for Students Who Use AAC with Lauren Enders

We’re so happy to welcome Lauren Enders back to share some more thoughts on AAC and the IEP. In her first post on this topic, Lauren addressed some frequently asked questions. Today, she provides a very valuable perspective on writing IEP goals for students who use or need AAC and some wonderful resources. Very often, I receive requests for support from teachers and speech therapists that are writing IEP goals for their students who use AAC.  When we sit down to discuss their questions, the first thing I remind them is that AAC goals are no different from any other IEP goal.  I recall a workshop I attended years ago presented by Gail VanTatenhove that helps put IEP goals for AAC into perspective.  Gail said that AAC therapy is just language therapy.  Isn’t that true? Aren’t we just teaching language?  For this student, language is simply being expressed in a... [Read More...]

AACtual Therapy: AAC Learning with Play Dough by Jamie Cooley

April 11, 2013 by - Leave your thoughts

AACtual Therapy: AAC Learning with Play Dough by Jamie Cooley

Today, we’re happy to introduce you to another AACtual Therapist, Jamie Cooley, the SLP for Belpre City Schools (belpre.k12.oh.us), located in Belpre, OH. She is a graduate of Ohio University (B.S. ’09, M.A. ’11) and currently resides in Athens, OH. Jamie did work at Ohio University focusing on AAC and children with autism under the instruction of Dr. John McCarthy and Dr. Joann Benigno. She has worked for Belpre City Schools for two years with students in grades K-12. In this post, Jamie uses a case study approach to share a lesson using Play Dough.    Background Emma is a third grade student. She was born with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, and her cognitive and communication skills are significantly below age-norms.  She receives most of her academic instruction in a resource room. Communicatively, Emma repeats many words and phrases, and combines up to two words on her own. This is... [Read More...]

30 Things to Do During Autism Awareness Month

March 26, 2013 by - Leave your thoughts

30 Things To Do During Autism Awareness Month

We love getting EVERYONE  involved in Autism Awareness/Acceptance Month.  We like to take a goal focused approach to our autism  activities by choosing projects that facilitate autism awareness & acceptance, positive attitudes, and  autism & communication learning.  We pass out materials, have contests, go to events, do extra talks, and try and engage EVERYONE we know and even some we do not know.  We do a lot of shopping (with small amount of money, but we have to EAT and accessorize).  Our families, pets, friends, and students all participate.  It is a month filled with purposeful fun.  Here are some of the things we will be doing. Please share any activities or projects that you know about. Read & share 5 references that support the use of AAC & Autism (evidence based research) Check out the Online Autistic Carnival which is currently accepting submission of various video documentaries (music, art, writing,... [Read More...]

5 PrAACtical Skills to Teach New AAC Facilitators

March 8, 2013 by - 4 Comments

5 PrAACtical Skills to Teach New AAC Facilitators

We have been out and about in our community these past couple of weeks. We have worked with speech-language pathologists, teachers, resource specialists, paraprofessionals, and families. We love doing AAC facilitator training because the impact is so important for not only our current AAC learners but for future AAC learners as well. There are really great professionals who want to provide the best AAC support possible. They want and need AAC information that will help them integrate AAC facilitation strategies into their already very busy days. Here are 5 AAC facilitation strategies that have made the most impact: Using Aided Language Input (ALI)– Talk AAC to the learner. This strategy is not only a very powerful teaching tool, but when discussed with new AAC facilitators, seems to make perfect sense (many have never heard of it).  One key for learning ALI is to practice it in a variety of activities... [Read More...]

Beyond Requesting: Thoughts on Teaching Information Transfer

February 2, 2013 by - 2 Comments

Beyond Requesting: Thoughts on Teaching Information Transfer

Although it has been close to 25 years since Dr. Janice Light’s hallmark paper on communicative competence in AAC discussed four main purposes of communication, many AAC systems are still heavily populated with messages for basic wants and needs. The other areas – information transfer, social closeness, social etiquette – are often underrepresented in AAC systems. We scratched the surface of how to teach basic requesting last month, and now we’re ready to talk about communicating for other reasons. In this post, we’ll talk about some of the clinical issues in teaching communication for the purpose of information transfer. A big reason that we express ourselves is to share information that others want or need. It may not seem like a high priority until we realize how often we need to do this to function in our daily lives. Here are some examples, both positive and negative, from our work... [Read More...]

AACtual Therapy: Breakthroughs with Bubbles!

January 31, 2013 by - 4 Comments

AACtual Therapy: Breakthroughs with Bubbles!

We couldn’t be happier that one of our first AACtual Therapists is Tanna Neufeld, a south Floridian on loan to the Pacific Northwest. Tanna was with us as a graduate student many years ago, and went on to build a fantastic reputation in our community for her excellent clinical skills. It was South Florida’s loss when she left last year and moved across the continent. (I know at least a few people scheming of ways to get her back.) Tanna is now working at the Children’s Therapy Center in Seattle. Tanna blogs at SNEAK Outside the Box and My Blind Side. You can read more about her at the end of this post, in which Tanna talks about using bubbles in her AAC therapy sessions. AAC Breakthroughs with Bubbles! When I first started using core vocabulary boards with my kids, I didn’t really know where to start.  It was really... [Read More...]

Making It Work: The PrAACtical Side of Therapy to Teach Requests

January 26, 2013 by - 2 Comments

Making It Work: The PrAACtical Side of Therapy to Teach Requests

This month we’ve been talking about requesting and choicemaking, specifically how to teach it. Today, we’ll put it into a clinical context by talking about a hypothetical session that targets this skill, but also highlights other strategies. As you read about the materials, preparation, and script, look for how they incorporate strategies such as building specific communication opportunities {CO}, aided language input {ALI}, and expansions {EX}. The clinician also builds in repetition with variety so that there is sufficient opportunities for teaching and practice using multiple modes of communication. In this scenario, you’ll meet Jenna, a 5 year old with significant language difficulties secondary to Cri du Chat syndrome. Jenna’s communication system includes about a dozen manual signs (SIGN), 20-25 word approximations (SPEECH), a few gestures (GEST), some manual communication boards (COMM BD), and an iPad with a full-featured AAC app (iPAD). She also uses movement (MOVEMT), vocalizations (VOC), and... [Read More...]

How I Do It: Encouraging AAC Implementation

January 17, 2013 by - 26 Comments

How I Do It: Encouraging AAC Implementation

Nothing makes us happier than hearing AAC success stories. It’s thrilling to hear of folks who are using AAC tools and strategies to communicate effectively. We love hearing how their language develops and the positive changes that makes in their lives. It also makes us curious as to what made ‘this’ story a success story. One of our goals for the new year was to give PrAACtical AAC followers a look into the experiences of professionals outside their own communities. Last week, we introduced AACtual Therapy, a series of guest posts by SLPs who are willing to give us a peek into their AAC therapy sessions. Today, we introduce How I Do It, a series in which we invite SLPs to share how they tackle common issues, tasks, or problems. We’re excited to launch the series with a post from Lauren Enders, a clinician who supports the AAC community beyond... [Read More...]

PrAACtical Thoughts on Thematic Language Therapy: Part 2

January 16, 2013 by - Leave your thoughts

PrAACtical Thoughts on Thematic Language Therapy

Thematic language therapy can be part of a meaningful language experience.  This is true for everyone but especially helpful for learners with social communication/language difficulties.  The theme of a session or theme of a month (or semester) can help a learner understand the relationship of individual activities to a larger main idea. For some learners it is easier to understand the details than to understand the ‘big picture’. By adding well thought out thematic features in intervention, the learner can then have many opportunities to relate the component parts of a theme to a main topic. Another aspect and benefit of thematic language learning has to do with word, concept, & vocabulary access. If a theme is used in a variety (or ALL) activities, there is a greater chance that the learner will be using similar words and concepts in talking, listening, reading and writing. By using all language modalities,  vocabulary, word... [Read More...]

PrAACtically Personal: Individualizing Communication Books

December 29, 2012 by - 2 Comments

PrAACtically Personal: Individualizing Communication Books

Custom tailored suit or off the shelf? Shoes that pinch or ones that are just snug?  It stands to reason that when something fits well, we are more likely to wear it. Communication books, like clothes, have to ‘fit’ the user. But what does that really mean? When we’re ‘tailoring’ a communication book for someone who is learning to use AAC, there are three areas that we think about: How it looks, what it has inside, and how it ‘sounds.’ Appearance & Aesthetics As we’ve said before, everyone deserves communication tools that look great. Communication books should reflect the style and personality of the person who’ll be using it. Customizing a communication book doesn’t need to be expensive. You can use special papers for the cover or pages, and stickers to decorate. Here are some ideas to get you started. Send them shopping: There’s nothing that speaks to ownership like... [Read More...]