Tag Archive: research

PrAACtical Resources: Scholarly Articles on Aided AAC

February 19, 2018 by - Leave your thoughts

PrAACtical Resources: Scholarly Articles on Aided AAC

Today we are excited to share a wonderful collection of articles that help to expand the theoretical underpinnings and empirical knowledge base in AAC. The Augmentative and Alternative Communication journal is providing free access to six articles that are part of an ongoing international collaboration of researchers and clinicians in 16 nations. You can access articles from this project, entitled “Becoming an Aided Communicator: Aided Language Skills in Children aged 5–15 years: A Multi-site and Cross-cultural Investigation,” below. Kudos to the International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication (ISAAC) and the journal co-editors (Drs. Martine Smith and Bronwyn Hemsley) and Dr. von Tetzchner for making this special issue so widely available. We hope you enjoy reading Aided Language Processes, Development, and Use: An International Perspective.

Filed under: ,

Tagged With: , , ,

Video of the Week: AAC, ASD, & Individual Differences

December 13, 2017 by - Leave your thoughts

Video of the Week: AAC, ASD, & Individual Differences

When you’ve worked with one person with autism, the saying goes, you’ve worked with one person with autism. It shouldn’t surprise us, then, that this diversity shows up in research data as well. In this presentation, we hear from Dr. David Trembath, from Griffith University in Australia, explores the individual differences in AAC research and discusses their implications. Many thanks to the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research and Collaboration in Autism (CIRCA) at the University of British Columbia, for making this video available. Direct link to video – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TvZ-XH6SLVU

Filed under:

Tagged With:

PrAACtical Research: AAC Intervention for Children with ASD

December 4, 2017 by - Leave your thoughts

PrAACtical Research: AAC Intervention for Children with ASD

Dr. Kathy Howery is back with another helpful post an AAC research. Kathy is based in Alberta, Canada, and has worked in the field of AT and special education for over three decades. In the past year, she completed her doctoral studies where she used phenomenological methods to seek to understand the lived experience of speaking with/through a speech generating device. Kathy is currently working as a consultant to schools and school districts across Alberta focusing primarily on children and youth with complex communication needs. In this article, she discusses research on AAC interventions. Enjoy! ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: Almirall, D. , DiStefano, C., Chang, Y.-C., Shire, S., Kaiser, A., Lu X, Nahum-Shani, I., Landa, R., Mathy, P. & Kasari, C. (2016). Longitudinal Effects of Adaptive Interventions with a Speech-Generating Device in Minimally Verbal Children with ASD. Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, 45(4), 442-456. What this article is all about (the focus... [Read More...]

Filed under: ,

Tagged With: ,

Watch It Wednesday: Viva La Evidence

December 31, 2014 by - Leave your thoughts

Watch It Wednesday: Viva La Evidence

“A 21st century clinician who cannot critically read a study is as unprepared as one who cannot take blood pressure or examine the cardiovascular system.” What better way to end one year and usher in the new, than a reminder of the role of scientific study in our profession? In AAC, there isn’t as much research as we would like, but we sure do need to make it our business to evaluate and use the empirical evidence that we do have. P.S. We like Coldplay a little more now. :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::  Glasziou, P., Burls, A.,& Gilbert, R. (2008). Evidence based medicine and the medical curriculum: The search engine is now as essential as the stethoscope. The BMJ, 337, 704. Direct Link to Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QUW0Q8tXVUc  

Filed under:

Tagged With: , , ,

Watch It Wednesday: Eye Gaze Research

August 6, 2014 by - Leave your thoughts

Watch It Wednesday: Eye Gaze Research

Today, we’ll take a look at a collaborative effort by researchers at University College London (Department of Developmental Science), Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (Neurodisability Service), and Barnsley Hospital. These researchers are investigating the eye gaze patterns of children with cerebral palsy who have little or no functional speech. Could tracking eye movements be a useful way to assess language skills? This is a line of research we will be watching. Direct Link: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/gaze

Filed under:

Tagged With: , ,

Research Tuesday: Comparing Picture Exchange and SGDs

June 10, 2014 by - Leave your thoughts

Research Tuesday: Comparing Picture Exchange and SGDs

Picture exchange is powerful strategy for building symbolic communication in individuals with significant communication difficulties. We’ve posted about implementation of PECS a few times, and included references to research supporting its efficacy in some additional posts. Today, we look at a sequence of three single subject design experimental studies by Dr. Jeff Sigafoos and other researchers that looked at how the use of picture exchange and AAC devices (SGD condition) impacted social interaction. In the initial study, the team taught requesting skills either with picture exchange or AAC devices and then looked to see if there were any changes in social interaction. They hypothesized that the physical act of picking up a symbol and giving it to someone, as with the picture exchange condition, would make the learner less likely to turn away from his communication partner. So, in addition to measuring how well the participant learned to make requests,... [Read More...]

Filed under:

Tagged With: , , , ,

Converting Disordered Natural Speech to Clear Synthetic Speech

February 20, 2014 by - Leave your thoughts

Converting Disordered Natural Speech to Clear Synthetic Speech

One of the exciting things about being in an AT-related field, is watching new developments  in technology. Many of us have worked with individuals who have intact language and severely impaired speech. When we last wrote about ViviVoca (Voice-Input, Voice-Output Communication Aid), it generated a lot of interest as a potential support for some individuals who struggle with face-to-face communication. The research efforts are lead by Dr. Mark Hawley, Professor of Health Services Research at the University of Sheffield, in the UK. We’re pleased to be able to share a video showing this emerging technology in aaction. Direct Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTyjlM2jYMs  

Filed under:

Tagged With: , , , , ,

10 References Supporting AAC Use in Inclusive Settings

January 22, 2014 by - Leave your thoughts

10 References Supporting AAC Use in Inclusive Settings

We sometimes get contacted by colleagues who are looking for references supporting the use of AAC. Here are some that are specific to inclusive settings in schools and in the community.*  Alquraini, T., & Gut, D. (2012). Critical components of successful inclusion of students with severe disabilities: Literature review. International Journal of Special Education, 27(1), 42-59. Balandin, S., & Duchan, J. (2007). Communication: Access to inclusion. Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 32(4), 230-232. Batorowicz, B., Mcdougall, S., & Shepherd, T. A. (2006). AAC and community partnerships: The participation path to community inclusion. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 22(3), 178-195. Calculator, S. (2009). Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) and inclusive education for students with the most severe disabilities. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 13 (1) 93-113. Carter, M., & Maxwell, K., (1998). Promoting interaction with children using augmentative communication through peer-directed intervention. International Journal of Disability, Development, and Education 45(1) 75-96. Daugherty,... [Read More...]

Filed under:

Tagged With: , , , , ,

Does AAC Really Work with Infants and Toddlers?

January 14, 2014 by - 5 Comments

Does AAC Really Work with Infants and Toddlers?

We are occasionally asked how old children have to be before you can begin teaching AAC. Our answer: There is no set minimum age. Nor is there any research evidence that one has to use an oral-language only approach for a set period of time before beginning AAC. Today, we’re delighted to be able to share an article on this topic with you. This article describes a research review in which Branson and Demchak identified a dozen research studies looking specifically at the use of various AAC tools and strategies with infants and toddlers. Data from 190 children up to 36 months of age were examined. Of the 12 studies reviewed, 7 met criteria for having conclusive findings. In 97% of all cases, the children’s communication skills improved. Looking only at the 7 most rigorous studies is even more encouraging: All 135 babies/toddlers demonstrated improved communication skills following AAC intervention.... [Read More...]

Filed under:

Tagged With: , , ,