133 Search Results for schedules

PrAACtical Mini-Schedules

March 24, 2012 by - Leave your thoughts

Mini Schedules

We were looking for some specific resources for a distant colleague. We wanted to get as much good information as possible because this colleague was not in our field but in another department that has direct impact over work.  We do not necessarily see ‘eye to eye’ on many issues so we thought it might be helpful to our working relationship.   In the process, a young man and his family would get some much-needed support.  In our exploration, we found some great new videos about schedules- our topic of the month.    We found several very prAACtical videos by the Watson Institute about  mini schedules. We have found mini schedules to be very helpful for activities of daily living, community activities, leisure time activities and even in special event activities.  We love that the Watson Institute put these on you -tube for everyone to learn from. They even have a you-tube video... [Read More...]

Strategy of the Month: Types of Visual Schedules

March 17, 2012 by - Leave your thoughts

Strategy of the Month: Types of Visual Schedules

When people think about visual schedules, they tend to think about a classroom schedule with PCS for each major activity of  the day. These are great and we look for them whenever we do classroom visits. In this post, we hope to inspire some of you to use other types of visual schedules as well. We haven’t quite worked out the right terms for these (and we welcome your suggestions) but, conceptually we know that there are three main levels of visual schedules. Each level conveys information about what is happening in a specific segment of time. – At the Calendar Level, the schedule represents what’s happening throughout the month and/or week. – At the Schedule Level, we’re representing the events of a particular day, a portion of a day, or a session (or class period). – At the Task Level, the schedule reflects discrete steps of an activity or... [Read More...]

Video of the Week: Object Schedules

March 11, 2012 by - Leave your thoughts

Video of the Week: Object Schedules

This month we’re focusing on visual schedules. Some of our AAC friends have had great success with object schedules, so we’re a little surprised that more people don’t use them. Here’s a nice video on the strategy from the wonderful team at OCALI.  

Visual Schedules 411

March 10, 2012 by - 1 Comment

Visual Schedules 411

Visual schedules come in all shapes and sizes. The process of deciding which one to use begins with two questions: What is the purpose of this particular visual schedule? How will it be used? Both of these drive the decisions you make about which format to use. If my primary purpose in making the visual schedule is to help a student become more independent in following the steps in a task, and I know the person is going to be seated at a desk while doing this, I may choose a horizontal layout that shows the sequence. Because it is a school-aged child and we are activity working on literacy skills, I consider a stationary format on the desk surface that has the student use a check-off system. Having the student cross out or check off the steps as they are completed, gives authentic practice with writing skills. On the... [Read More...]

Video of the Week: Visual Schedules & Inclusion

March 4, 2012 by - Leave your thoughts

Video of the Week: Visual Schedules & Inclusion

We love strategies that work for everyone and visual schedules certainly fall into that category. Although the my planner might look different from the ones used by kids in our AAC preschool, the purposes are quite similar. This video from Kids Included Together (KIT) project at the National Training Center on Inclusion makes that point well. Watch for the nice examples of schedules using pictures and objects.    

Improving Assessment Practices for Students Who Use AAC: Mobilizing the Power of Social Narratives

January 6, 2022 by - Leave your thoughts

Improving Assessment Practices for Students Who Use AAC: Mobilizing the Power of Social Narratives

Social narratives are an empirically supported intervention that can be helpful in supporting people with AAC needs. They are commonly used to help individuals with autism understand and deal with challenging situations such as fire drills, birthday parties, and trips to the dentist. All types of social narratives can be written in text alone or include pictures and illustrations.  Social Stories are a particular kind of social narrative that have a specific set of guidelines for their development and use. The originator of Social Stories, Carol Gray, defines Social Stories this way: “A Social Story accurately describes a context, skill, achievement, or concept according to 10 defining criteria. These criteria guide Story research, development, and implementation to ensure an overall patient and supportive quality, and a format, ‘voice’, content, and learning experience that is descriptive, meaningful, respectful, and physically, socially, and emotionally safe for the Story audience (a child, adolescent,... [Read More...]

AAC-friendly Library Visits: 5 PrAACtical Ideas

September 20, 2021 by - 1 Comment

AAC-friendly Library Visits: 5 PrAACtical Ideas

The community of AAC practitioners and families includes many people who have strong connections to their school or community libraries. In today’s post, we share some thoughts and resources on making library visits more accessible and engaging to those with AAC needs. Social narratives are a wonderful, evidence-based way to help AAC learners prepare for the experience of visiting the library. These work best when the pictures and text are customized to fit the specific library situation that the AAC learner will encounter. Here are some examples. Nicole Caldwell’s example of a social narrative Lancaster Public Library Social Narrative for Children Social Narrative for Teens  Take a video tour of the library, like this one from Powell River Library. If your local library doesn’t have an online video tour, suggest that they create one or, if you’re feeling ambitious, create your own. Create a visual schedule or picture checklist for... [Read More...]

AAC Fair Testing Practices: Preparation

September 2, 2021 by - Leave your thoughts

AAC Fair Testing Practices: Preparation

In an earlier post, we talked about the difficulties that people who use AAC experience when they have to participate in tests or other assessments for educational or therapeutic purposes. (You can see that post here.) One approach to addressing these challenges is for key stakeholders to come together and develop a set of guidelines that teachers, therapists, and others can use when they need to administer an assessment.  Today, we’ll look at some of the guiding questions that teams can use to develop these Fair Testing Practices. The idea here is that AAC users, families, professionals, and other team members can come together to discuss a number of specific issues regarding preparation, materials, means of answering questions, etc. Later in the series, we’ll talk about ways to facilitate meaningful participation by individuals who use AAC but are still developing their communication and language skills. For the time being, though,... [Read More...]

TELL ME About It: AAC Learning with ‘Dear Zoo’!

November 9, 2020 by - Leave your thoughts

TELL ME About It: AAC Learning with ‘Dear Zoo’!

Ready for another post with book-related ideas for supporting core vocabulary learning in preschool classrooms? We’re excited to welcome Jeanna Antrim and Maggie Judson back to these pages with another guest post the TELL ME About It series. Today, they share ideas for core vocabulary experiences with an old favorite, Dear Zoo.If you’re in search of ways to support preschool teachers who are implementing the TELL ME program with their young students, this post is for you. There are quite a few resource links embedded in this post, ready for you to download. Maggie and Jeanna are speech-language pathologists who work in the Assistive Technology Department for the Belleville Area Special Services Cooperative (BASSC) in southern Illinois. They are AT/AAC facilitators and provide evaluations, direct therapy, consultations, and trainings with school teams. ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: TELL ME About It: AAC Learning with ‘Dear Zoo’! TELL ME About The Book The third book... [Read More...]