Tag Archive: speech intelligibility

How We Do It: Using AAC to Repair Communication Breakdowns

September 18, 2017 by - Leave your thoughts

How We Do It: Using AAC to Repair Communication Breakdowns

We’ve had many nice comments about the resources shared by AAC SLP Alicia Garcia, clinical lead of the AAC Clinic at One Kids Place, a children’s treatment centre in northern Ontario. With over two decades of experience in pediatric rehabilitation practice in private and public settings, Alicia’s ideas for how to support AAC learners and their families are tried and true. In today’s post, Alicia shares thoughts and materials for situations in which the AAC is needed to repair communication breakdowns. :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: Children with unclear speech not only have different intelligibility levels but also different levels of awareness, focus, and interest on repairing their communication breakdowns. We use different approaches based on how they react and respond when they are not understood. As a general guideline when a communication breakdown occurs, regardless of the child’s profile, we first try determining the level of urgency or importance of the child’s intended... [Read More...]

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Say What?!? AAC Assessment for Children Who Speak with Dr. Jill Senner and Matthew Baud

May 12, 2015 by - 7 Comments

Say What?!? AAC Assessment for Children Who Speak. with Dr. Jill Senner and Matthew Baud

While the Index of Augmented Speech Comprehensibility in Children (I-ASCC) has been around for almost 20 years, few clinicians know and use it. In this post, we welcome back Matthew Baud and Jill Senner to talk about how they are using this assessment tool. Enjoy! AAC evaluations can be challenging, especially if there is disagreement among team members as to whether AAC is necessary or not.  We frequently see disagreements about AAC arise when a student is able to speak.  Let’s examine the following case. Mrs. Brown has had Johnny in her class for the last 2 years and she “understands everything” he is saying during their routine calendar time.  The new SLP, who only sees Johnny once weekly for 30 minutes, tried to elicit information about his weekend at home and reported that she “didn’t understand anything.” What is going on here?  How can two communication partners have such vastly... [Read More...]

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Converting Disordered Natural Speech to Clear Synthetic Speech

February 20, 2014 by - Leave your thoughts

Converting Disordered Natural Speech to Clear Synthetic Speech

One of the exciting things about being in an AT-related field, is watching new developments  in technology. Many of us have worked with individuals who have intact language and severely impaired speech. When we last wrote about ViviVoca (Voice-Input, Voice-Output Communication Aid), it generated a lot of interest as a potential support for some individuals who struggle with face-to-face communication. The research efforts are lead by Dr. Mark Hawley, Professor of Health Services Research at the University of Sheffield, in the UK. We’re pleased to be able to share a video showing this emerging technology in aaction. Direct Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTyjlM2jYMs  

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Speech Supplementation Strategies

June 15, 2013 by - 6 Comments

Speech Supplementation Strategies

Anyone who has had a conversation with someone affected by aphasia is probably familiar with the ‘20 Questions’ approach to resolving communication breakdowns. Asking questions helps us take the piece of the message we understand (or think we do!) and build on that to gain more insight into the communicator’s intent. Take this exchange between a woman, Sandy, and her mother-in-law, Joan. Joan had a stroke a few years back and has both aphasia and dysarthria. Joan: “Gay” Sandy: “Gay? What do you mean, mom? Someone’s gay?” Joan: Shake head. “Gay” Sandy: “I’m not sure, mom. Gay?” Joan: “Gay” Points to the front door Sandy: “Kay? Are you telling me about Kay from across the street?” Joan: “Gay.” Nods Sandy: “What about Kay? Did she call?” Joan: Shakes head no Sandy: “Do I need to call her?” Joan: Shakes head no Sandy: “Did she stop by?” Joan: “Aaadihdih” Sandy: “Did... [Read More...]

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Let’s Get Specific About Speech Intelligibility

November 23, 2012 by - Leave your thoughts

Let’s Get Specific About Speech Intelligibility

When we’re writing AAC evaluation reports, compiling funding documents, and summarizing the present level of performance in IEPs, we frequently comment on speech intelligibility. In some cases, we’ve administered a standardized assessment instrument and are sharing those results. Often, though, the comments are more descriptive in nature. It is not uncommon to read documentation in which someone with articulation difficulties is described as having speech intelligibility that is mildly, moderately, or severely impaired. Those categories are pretty broad, open to interpretation, and can be quite vague. What do we really mean when saying that someone does or doesn’t have intelligible speech? To narrow down the meaning, we specify the two variables that have the greatest influence on how comprehensible the communicator’s speech output actually is: the context and the communication partner. Specifying whether the context is known and the partner is a familiar one, helps us better interpret the descriptors... [Read More...]

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