PrAACtical Thinking 5 AAC Tips for Talking About Halloween After It is Over

Published on November 1st, 2013 | by Robin Parker

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Fun Friday: 5 AAC Tips for Talking About Halloween After it is Over

Language learning involves talking about events in the past, present, and future.  Since Halloween is over, it is a perfect opportunity to help AAC users talk about past events. Here are 5 tips for getting started with ALL learners.

  1. Use a weekly or monthly (calendar) schedule to ‘remember’ Halloween or if you are sticking to core words to remember the “great day” or “bad day” depending upon the experience.
  2. Use photos of the Halloween festivities to discuss what happened, what everyone did, and you could even go for the best and/or worst part of the day.  Fun Friday: 5 AAC Tips for Talking About Halloween After it is Over
  3. Use a Venn diagram to compare and contrast Halloween experiences. This can be done with comparing 2 people or 2 groups.  For some learners, you can use images to put Halloween things that everyone saw or did while others you will need text only.  Then, a  discussion of what each student/group did that was the same versus different can be put in the Venn diagram and explained by each learner. (Example created with Kidspiration)Fun Friday: 5 AAC Tips for Talking About Halloween After it is Over
  4. Do a survey of favorite costumes, best candy, etc. Use a list format. This can be done in school, speech-language intervention, or at home.
  5. Write a story about personal Halloween experiences.  The story can be a chat book or a general personal Halloween story.  The language used in the book should be at or just above the level of the language learner so it serves as a model for how to ‘talk’ about events. You can stick to core words or focus on fringe vocabulary depending upon the learners language goals.  Stories are great ways of focusing on the whole event, specific parts of speech in context (e.g., attributes/adjectives, etc.).

Have fun finishing up with Halloween and get ready to move to talking about the future-  Thanksgiving, December holidays,  and vacations.). There are always things to talk about!

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About the Author

Robin Parker

Robin Parker Robin Parker is a professor of speech language pathology who has loved supporting the communication and language of children and adults with autism spectrum disorders for more than 20 years. One of her professional passions is spreading the word about PrAACtical AAC. “Alone we can do so little, together we can do so much." Helen Keller



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